When people think of Bob Moog, they undoubtedly recall the fact that he was the inventor of the Moog synthesizer…
a groundbreaking synthesis of electronics, engineering, control voltage, modularity, and musicianship.

What they may not know is the depth and breadth of Bob Moog’s career over the course of his life. Examination of the incredible technological and musical contributions of this innovator reveals the impact his work had on the history of music and popular culture.

This timeline focuses on his career (as opposed to his personal life, Moog Music, or other aspects) and is by no means exhaustive. The scope of Bob’s contributions is vast, and as relevant points emerge, they will be added to here.

If you have information or materials that you would like to share with us to enrich the timeline, please email us
at info@moogfoundation.org.

To get the most out of our timeline, please explore the “Read More” tabs, which will take you to additional assets, including full articles, pages from Bob’s desktop notebooks, schematics, and other archival materials. All of the images are expandable.

The timeline is based on the vast historical materials in the Bob Moog Foundation Archives.
To assist our continued efforts to preserve and share these archives, please make a donation here.

1934 - ROBERT MOOG IS BORN

May 23, 1934 Robert Arthur Moog is born in Flushing, New York to George and Shirley Moog. He is their only child. Read more

1939 - BOB BEGINS ATTENDING P.S. 24 ELEMENTARY

Bob begins attending P.S. 24 elementary school in Flushing, New York, where he excelled as a student throughout his nine years there. Read more

1944 - GEORGE TEACHES BOB ELECTRONICS

Ten-year-old Bob Moog begins building simple radios, three-note organs, and other electronic hobbyist projects with his father, who is an electrical engineer with Con Edison, New York City's electric company. Read more

1948 - BOB GRADUATES FROM P.S. 24

Bob graduates from P.S. 24. His mother recounts a story that Bob won so many academic awards at the year-end ceremony of his 8th grade year, that the parent behind her said jokingly, "If that kid gets up one more time, I'm going to smack him." Read more

1949 - BOB ATTENDS BRONX HIGH SCHOOL OF SCIENCE

Bob Moog begins attending the Bronx High School of Science and builds his first hobby theremin as part of a science fair project. He is 15 years old. Read more

1949 - BOB IS AWARDED FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF AN ELECTRIC ORGAN AND A GEIGER COUNTER

Bob wins an award for the construction of an electric organ and a Geiger counter. In December of that year, both are displayed at the convention of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Read more

1952 - BRONX HIGH SCHOOL OF SCIENCE GRADUATION

Bob Moog graduates from the Bronx High School of Science. His time there is marked by building electronic musical instruments as part of the school's Science Congress Shows, including theremins, and "Moogatrons", electronic organs with different pitch levels, which he performed on with the school orchestra. Read more

1952 - BOB IS ACCEPTED INTO FIVE YEAR DUAL DEGREE

Bob is accepted into a five year dual electrical engineering and physics degree at Queens College and Columbia University. Read more

1953 - BOB AND GEORGE OPERATE AS RAMCO FROM THEIR BASEMENT WORKSHOP

After spending a summer working in an electronics factory (Kepco Power Supplies) 19-year-old Bob Moog creates the Model 201 theremin in his father's basement workshop in Flushing, New York. It is his first commercial product. Bob focused on the wiring of the theremins and George, an amateur woodworker, created the cabinetry. This collaboration would continue until Bob left the household to obtain his PhD four years later. Read more

1954 - BOB WRITES A MAGAZINE ARTICLE ABOUT THEREMINS

"The Theremin", an article in which Bob describes how to construct a theremin, is featured in the January issue of the nationally-distributed popular hobbyist magazine, Radio and Television News. Bob is 19 years old at the time. Read more

1954 - RAMCO IS RENAMED R.A. MOOG CO.

Bob and George continue to build theremins and do-it-yourself kits in the basement of their family home in Flushing in order to meet the demands created by the publication of Bob's "The Theremin" article published in January of that year. Read more

1954 - BOB CREATES MODELS 301 AND 351

Under his newly named company R.A. Moog Co., Bob creates the Model 301 and Model 351 theremins. The Model 351 features tone-shaping functionality that hints at Bob’s future in synthesis.
Read more

1955 - BOB MEETS RAYMOND SCOTT

Bob meets musician, composer, bandleader, and inventor Raymond Scott for the first time and is commissioned to build a theremin for him—which was incorporated into Scott's device, the "Clavivox." Read more

1956 - BOB JOINS SPERRY

Bob works in the Marine Department for Sperry, an electronics and equipment manufacturer in New York, as student engineer for the summer. This is the first time he works with the burgeoning technology of transistors.
Read more

1956 - BOB WRITES ARTICLE FOR AUDIOCRAFT MAGAZINE

Bob writes an article entitled "Music From Electrons", which was featured in the June edition of Audiocraft Magazine. Read more

1957 - BOB GRADUATES WITH DUAL DEGREE IN PHYSICS AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Bob receives a Bachelor's Degree in physics from Queens College and a Bachelor's Degree in electrical engineering from Columbia University. He lives at home with his parents during his five years of study, and runs his business, R.A. Moog Co., on the side. Read more

1957 - BOB IS ACCEPTED AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Bob begins his engineering physics PhD. at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Bob brings his R.A. Moog Co. business with him and continues to build theremins on the side throughout his doctoral studies. Read more

1957 - BOB RECEIVES RCA FELLOWSHIP

Bob receives the prestigious RCA Fellowship, which covers his tuition, room, and board at Cornell. Read more

1957 - THE VANGUARD THEREMIN

In Ithaca, New York, Bob creates the Vanguard theremin. While the name might suggest a device on the forefront of technological advance, the Vanguard was the last theremin Bob designed using the older technology of vacuum tubes. Its wedge-shaped mahogany case was reminiscent of the RCA theremin. The Vanguard featured an "all-in-one" approach that placed the loudspeaker within the theremin itself.
Read more

1957 - THE PROFESSIONAL THEREMIN

Bob implements the new transistor technology for the first time to create the Professional theremin. Bob's use of transistor technology would prove foundational in his future synthesizer designs. Read more

1961 - THE MELODIA THEREMIN

Bob creates the Melodia theremin. This theremin, as a result of the 1961 Electronics World article, ended up being a best seller. Read more

1961 - THE MELODIA IS A GREAT SUCCESS

The revenue from the simple, transistorized, and battery-powered Melodia set in motion the chain of events that led to Bob's creation of the Moog modular synthesizer. If you ordered a Melodia kit, there was a good chance that it was assembled by Shirleigh Moog on the Moogs' kitchen table. Read more

1962 - THE TROUBADOR THEREMIN

Bob's Troubador theremin was a "professional version of the Melodia." It could be placed on a tabletop (without the table interfering with its operation), had AC power, and allowed control over the timbre of the sound. Read more

1963 - WALTER SEAR JOINS R.A. MOOG CO.

Walter Sear is hired as the company's first New York representative. Based in New York City, Sear was an established studio owner and engineer/producer, as well as a representative for high-end tubas imported from Europe. Read more

1963 - R.A. MOOG CO. OPENS IN TRUMANSBURG

R.A. Moog Co. moves out of Bob’s house and into its Trumansburg storefront. Read more

1963 - BOB MEETS HERB DEUTSCH

In November, while demonstrating his theremins at the New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) convention, Bob Moog meets Hofstra music professor and experimental jazz composer Herbert Deutsch. This meeting leads to talk of Deutsch's desire for electronic music components. Read more

1964 - BOB WORKS WITH HERB TO CREATE VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED MODULES

In cooperation with Herbert Deutsch, Bob develops his first voltage-controlled modular electronic music equipment. Read more

1964 - R.A. MOOG CO.'S 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY

To commemorate R.A. Moog Co.'s 10-year anniversary, Bob implemented a new logo design. Read more

1964 - BOB PRESENTS MODULES AT AES CONVENTION

Bob's voltage-controlled modules are presented for the first time at the Audio Engineering Society (AES) convention in New York City. Choreographer Alwin Nikolais is Bob's first customer. During the convention Bob meets composer Wendy Carlos, at his booth. Read more

1964 - BOB'S ARTICLE ON VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED MODULES IS PUBLISHED IN 1964 AES PUBLICATION

Bob writes an article entitled "Voltage-Controlled Electronic Music Modules", which was presented at the annual meeting of the Audio Engineering Society in October of 1964. Read more

1965 - BOB COLLABORATES WITH JOHN CAGE

Bob builds movement-sensing rhythmic devices for John Cage's performance "Variations V," which were activated by dancers performing Merce Cunningham's choreography.
Read more

1965 - BOB RECEIVES PHD. IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Bob receives his PhD. in engineering physics from Cornell University. Read more

1965 - R.A. MOOG CO. HOSTS ELECTRONIC MUSIC WORKSHOP

Starting August 9, R.A. Moog Co. held a three week Electronic Music Workshop administered by Bob Moog and Herb Deutsch. The seminar focused on the history, technology, and application of Electronic Music, and was announced nationally. There were 12 participants and the seminar ended in a performance of the resultant compositions of the participants. Read more

1965 - HERB PERFORMS WITH THE MOOG PROTOTYPE

Herb Deutsch performs with the Moog prototype at the Town Hall in New York City on September 25th. Read more

1966 - BOB WORKS WITH HARALD BODE

Bob works with seminal German electronic keyboard designer Harald Bode to incorporate Bode's ring modulator and frequency shifter designs into R.A. Moog's product line. Harald Bode had been designing synthesizer-like devices since 1937, and his Vladimir Ussachevsky-inspired modulation designs were a perfect compliment to Moog's synthesizer designs. Read more

1966 - BOB WRITES AN ARTICLE ABOUT ELECTRONIC MUSIC FOR ELECTRONICS WORLD

Read more

1966 - BOB COMMISSIONED BY THE BEACH BOYS

The Beach Boys commission what was a prototype ribbon controller (called a "Melsinar") from Bob Moog for performing their hit song "Good Vibrations" live. This device was to take the place of the Electro-Theremin, invented by Paul Tanner and Bob Whitsell, which was used in the original recording of the song. The Melsinar was more portable and easier to use on the road. Read more

1967 - THE SYNTHESIZER I, II & III

The R.A. Moog Co. introduces standardized systems as models (The Synthesizer I, The Synthesizer II, and The Synthesizer III), and first uses the term "synthesizer" to describe them. Read more

1967 - WENDY CARLOS DEMONSTRATES THE 900 SERIES

R.A. Moog Co. releases the demo record "Moog 900 Series Electronic Music Systems". Conceived by Bob Moog and produced/performed by Wendy Carlos, the recording demonstrates the functionality of the Moog modular system. Read more

1967 - THE WEST COAST MEETS THE MOOG SYNTHESIZER

In June, R.A. Moog Co. representatives Paul Beaver and Bernie Krause introduce the West Coast to the Moog synthesizer at the Monterey Pop Festival. In so doing, they introduce the instrument to a number of popular music artists including The Monkees, The Byrds, The Doors, and Simon and Garfunkel. Read more

1967 - THE MOOG MODULAR APPEARS ON A MAJOR ROCK ALBUM

The Doors employ the help of Paul Beaver to use a synthesizer to process vocals on their album "Strange Days", released in September. It is the first appearance of the Moog modular on a major rock album. Read more

1967 - MOOG MODEL IIIP IS USED IN PRODUCTION OF MONKEES ALBUM

In September, Mickey Dolenz of the Monkees purchases a Moog Model IIIP. This Moog, often programmed and played by Paul Beaver, makes an appearance on the Monkees' "Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, & Jones Ltd." album, released in November. Read more

1968 - SWITCHED-ON BACH IS RELEASED

Wendy Carlos releases the album "Switched-On Bach" in November. Her deft application of the principles of synthesis to the work of Bach was groundbreaking. The quality and subsequent popularity of this album introduced the voltage-controlled modular synthesizer to the world. Read more

1968 - BOB BUILDS CUSTOM SYNTHESIZER FOR PETER NERO

Bob creates a synthesizer from a commission by famous pianist Peter Nero. The synthesizer was a limited set of modules in a case that fit beneath the piano bench. It was activated by a 44-note keyboard.
Read more

1968 - VOCODER DESIGNED FOR UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO

Bob is the first to design a vocoder using semiconductor technology and active filters. This was commissioned by the University of Buffalo. Read more

1969 - BOB COMPLETES COORDINATED ELECTRONIC MUSIC STUDIO

Bob finishes the CEMS (Coordinated Electronic Music Studio), an integrated programmable modular production system ordered by composer Joel Chadabe in 1967. It is installed at the State University of New York at Albany where Chadabe was a professor. The CEMS system was comprised of variety of normal synthesizer modules coupled eight analog sequencers with customized hardware that synchronized them. As such, it was a substantial and unique system. Read more

1969 - WENDY CARLOS WINS TWO GRAMMY AWARDS FOR SWITCHED-ON BACH

Wendy Carlos wins two Grammy Awards for "Switched-On Bach": Album of the Year Classical, and Best Classical Performance Soloist. Read more

1969 - THE MOOG MODULAR IS USED IN THE PRODUCTION OF ABBEY ROAD

The Beatles release their album "Abbey Road", which features a Moog modular synthesizer on several tracks, including "Maxwell's Silver Hammer", "Here Comes the Sun", "I Want You (She's So Heavy), and "Because". Read more

1969 - JAZZ IN THE GARDEN

August 28 saw the "Jazz in the Garden" series concert at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), featuring Herb Deutsch, Chris Swansen, and others in live performance with four Moog modular synthesizers. Read more

1970 - THE MINIMOOG

A simplified, portable, non-modular keyboard synthesizer is created: The Minimoog. The Minimoog was designed to be a more convenient and affordable performance synthesizer to meet the demand from musicians. Read more

1970 - KEITH EMERSON PURCHASES A MOOG MODULAR SYSTEM

Keith Emerson purchases an expanded and modified "1C" R. A. Moog modular system (lower cabinet pictured behind Bob) with preset functionality originally created for the 1969 Jazz in the Garden concert held at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City. Read more

1970 - SMALL BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD

Bob receives New York Small Businessman of the Year Award. The company was $250,000 in debt. Read more

1970 - GRAMMY TRUSTEES AWARD

Bob receives the Grammy Trustees Award, which is an award for individuals who, during their careers in music, have made significant contributions (other than performance) to the field of recording. Read more

1970 - MULTI-TOUCH SENSITIVE KEYBOARD

Bob begins working on his Multi-Touch Sensitive Keyboard design for composer John Eaton. Read more

1971 - R.A. MOOG CO. EVENTUALLY COMES TO BE CALLED MOOG MUSIC

R.A. Moog Co. is in a state of economic peril. Bob begins looking for a business partner who can relieve the company’s $250,000 debt. Bill Waytena purchases the R.A. Moog Co. and moves it from Trumansburg to Williamsville, New York. Bob stays on and signs a non-compete contract. Eventually, Waytena renames the company "Moog Music." Read more

1971 - MINIMOOG MARKET IS CREATED

The collaborative effort between Bob and others at R.A. Moog in regard to the creation of the Minimoog might have been in vain if not for the efforts of musician, showman, and consummate salesman David Van Koevering. His tireless and inspired efforts to market this invention (that was initially baffling to music retailers) created a viable market that wouldn't have existed without him. With the superlative work of Bob and the others at R.A. Moog coupled with Van Koevering's foundational efforts, the Minimoog was primed to become the iconic synth it became. Read more

1971 - MINIMOOG IS SHOWCASED AT SUMMER NAMM

In June, the Minimoog is showcased for the first time at a traditional musical instruments trade show: Summer NAMM in Chicago. Read more

1972 - THE MOOG SATELLITE IS RELEASED

The Satellite was Moog Music's response to products like the ARP Pro Soloist. The Satellite was designed to be an organ accessory that featured presets which allowed the user to add synthesizer sounds to their organ setup. It was designed at Moog, but manufactured by Thomas Organs. Read more

1972 - THE SONIC SIX

First production of the duophonic Moog Sonic Six. The Sonic Six was designed as an educational synthesizer. It is Bob's redesign of the Sonic V, a synthesizer designed by Gene Zumchak for Waytena's MuSonics company. Read more

1973 - NORLIN MUSIC AQUIRES MOOG MUSIC

Bob stays on at Moog Music after Bill Waytena has sold it to music instrument giant Norlin Music. Read more

1975 - THE MICROMOOG

The Micromoog, a low-cost single-oscillator "budget Minimoog" is released. It was designed by Bob Moog and and Moog Music engineer Jim Scott. Read more

1975 - BOB BEGINS WRITING FOR CONTEMPORARY KEYBOARD MAGAZINE

In 1975, Bob started writing the column "On Synthesizers" for Contemporary Keyboard (later named Keyboard) magazine. The column covered a wide variety of synthesis concepts in great detail. In addition to a number of one-off articles Bob wrote for Keyboard, he also wrote the "Vintage Synthesizers" column from September of 1989 to January of 1990. Read more

1976 - BOB COLLABORATES WITH LES PAUL

Bob works with Les Paul on Gibson's Lab Series amps (featuring a Moog-designed multi-filter) and also designs guitar foot pedals for Maestro. This all came about because Norlin, the owner of Moog Music, owned a lot of other music companies, including Gibson. Read more

1976 - BOB RECEIVES HONORARY DOCTORATE

Bob Receives Honorary Doctorate from Lycoming College. Read more

1976 - MOOG MUSIC MOVES TO CHEEKTOWAGA (BUFFALO)

Moog Music moves to Cheektowaga, New York. Read more

1977 - THE ART OF THE THEREMIN BY CLARA ROCKMORE

"The Art of the Theremin" is the first official album by theremin virtuoso Clara Rockmore, and the only one released in her lifetime. It was produced by Bob Moog and his first wife, Shirleigh Moog, and was released as an LP in 1977 by Delos International Records. Read more

1978 - BOB MOVES HIS FAMILY TO NORTH CAROLINA

Having left Moog Music, Bob moves his family to Leicester, North Carolina, just outside of Asheville. Read more

1978 - BOB CREATES BIG BRIAR

Bob creates a new company, Big Briar, Inc., to build custom musical instruments. The company is named after the landscape surrounding the house in which he lives and works. Read more

1981 - NORLIN'S MOOG MUSIC CANCELS PRODUCTION OF THE MINIMOOG

Norlin's Moog Music cancels production of the Minimoog. The last Minimoog (pictured here with Bob) that leaves the factory in January 1981 has the serial number 13,269. Read more

1981 - BOB BEGINS REPRESENTING SYNTON

Bob begins representing Felix Visser's Dutch synthesizer company Synton. The Synton modular was comprised of smaller modules, and was one of the few analog modular systems made at that time. Read more

1982 - BIG BRIAR FEATURES A NEW PRODUCT LINE

The Big Briar 1982 Catalog features three unique musical controller devices. The 100 Series was a keyboard controller of customizable functionality featuring MTS-like X-Y touch-sensitive keys. The 300 Series was a customizable touch pad similar to that which eventually made its way onto the Moog Voyager. The 500 Series was a customizable theremin-like controller. Read more

1982 - THE CRUMAR SPIRIT

The Crumar Spirit, a synthesizer designed by Bob with for Minimoog-co-inventor Jim Scott and former Director of Marketing for Moog Music Tom Rhea, is released by Italian keyboard company Crumar. It is a two-oscillator, two-filter keyboard synthesizer with extensive modulation routings. Read more

1983 - THE FAIRLIGHT CMI DEMONSTRATION

Bob endorses and demonstrates the Australian Fairlight CMI, a revolutionary microprocessor-driven sampler/synthesizer. Despite its high price and steep learning curve, the Fairlight became ubiquitous in popular music for the next couple of years. Read more

1983 - BOB AIDS KURZWEIL

Ray Kurzweil, disappointed with the sterile sound of the prototypes of his emulative digital synthesizer the K-250, decides to hire an analog consultant. That consultant was Bob Moog. Read more

1984 - BOB JOINS KURZWEIL

Bob moves his family to Natick, Massachusetts for his new position at Kurzweil: Vice President for New Products Research. He continues to operate as Big Briar, Inc. on the side, and spends most weekends working on John Eaton’s Multi-Touch Sensitive Keyboard. Read more

1986 - BOB WRITES ARTICLE ON MIDI FOR JOURNAL OF THE AUDIO ENGINEERING SOCIETY

Bob writes an in-depth article outlining the relatively-new MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) protocol for the Audio Engineering Society publication in May of 1986. MIDI became the universal standard for the control and interaction of electronic keyboards. Read more

1989 - BOB LEAVES KURZWEIL AND RETURNS TO NORTH CAROLINA

Bob leaves Kurzweil and moves his family back to North Carolina. Read more

1989 - BOB BEGINS TEACHING MUSIC TECHNOLOGY AT UNCA

Bob begins a three-year period of teaching music technology at the University of North Carolina in Asheville. Read more

1989 - BOB MEETS LEON THEREMIN

Bob meets Leon Theremin for the first time at the Bourges International Festival of Electronic Music in Bourges, France. Read more

1989 - BOB COMPLETES MULTI-TOUCH SENSITIVE KEYBOARD

Bob completes John Eaton's commission- the innovative Multiple-Touch Sensitive Keyboard. The "MTS" keyboard's final version is a microprocessor-controlled surface integrated with a piano-style keyboard to allow the placement of the players finger on the keys to control multiple aspects of the generation of the resultant synthesizer sound. Read more

1991 - BIG BRIAR PRODUCES SERIES 91 THEREMINS

Big Briar starts producing the Series 91 theremins. The instruments are similar to Leon Theremin's designs, but include modern technology. The Series 91 will remain in production for five years. Read more

1992 - EATON-MOOG MULTI TOUCH SENSITIVE KEYBOARD PERFORMANCE

The first performance of Eaton-Moog Multi Touch Sensitive Keyboard takes place in the University of Chicago's Mandel Hall. Read more

1993 - MOOG MUSIC CLOSES

Moog Music closes. The remaining equipment, documents, and products of Moog Music are auctioned off. Read more

1994 - BOB WRITES ARTICLE ON ELECTRONIC MUSIC FOR ENCYCLOPEDIA OF APPLIED PHYSICS

As a result of Bob's substantial contributions to the history of the style, and expertise in the field, he was asked to write the entry for "Electronic Music" in the Encyclopedia of Applied Physics, Vol. 11. Read more

1994 - Theremin - An Electronic Odyssey

Bob Moog is featured in Steven M. Martin's documentary "Theremin—An Electronic Odyssey". Read more

1996 - THE ETHERWAVE THEREMIN

Big Briar introduces the Etherwave theremin. Read more

1998 - THE ETHERVOX THEREMIN

Launch of Big Briar's Ethervox, a MIDI theremin. Read more

1998 - THE MOOGERFOOGER

Big Briar produces the first Moogerfooger—the MF-101, a standalone analog low-pass filter. This would be the first of a series of pedal-format electronic devices and effects such as Ring Modulators, Phasers, Analog Delays, Control Voltage Processors, and more. Read more

2000 - THEREMIN ETHER MUSIC AND ESPIONAGE BY ALBERT GLINSKY

Albert Glinsky's book "Theremin—Ether Music and Espionage", with a foreword from Bob Moog, is published. Read more

2001 - POLAR MUSIC PRIZE

Bob Moog wins the Polar Music prize of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music. The award is given for "significant achievements in music," and was also awarded to Burt Bacharach and Karlheinz Stockhausen that year. Read more

2002 - TECHNICAL GRAMMY AWARD

Bob Moog receives a Technical Grammy award (for contributions of outstanding technical significance to the recording field). Read more

2002 - BOB RECEIVES HONORARY DOCTORATE

Bob receives an honorary doctorate degree from the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Read more

2002 - BIG BRIAR IS RENAMED MOOG MUSIC

Bob regains the legal rights to the Moog name after a lengthy legal battle; Big Briar changes its name to Moog Music. Read more

2002 - THE VOYAGER

On August 31, Bob's new synthesizer, the Moog Voyager, is shipped. The Voyager, a performance synthesizer Bob had been working on for years, was a culmination of Bob's ideas and experience in the years since his time at the original Moog Music. Read more

2004 - MOOG BY HANS FJELLESTAD

"Moog", a documentary about Bob Moog by Hans Fjellestad, opens. Read more

2005 - BOB MOOG PASSES AWAY

On August 21, Bob Moog dies at the age of 71 in Asheville, North Carolina. Read more

2006 - THE BOB MOOG FOUNDATION IS FOUNDED

Bob's family and colleagues create the Bob Moog Foundation. Read more